Unrest in the book industry: Book sales go down sharply

Monday, 20 August 2018

After a sharp decline in paper book sales in the first half of 2018, and an equally bad summer, there is turmoil and concern among Norwegian publishers and bookstores.

These days, publishers publish their autumn books with brass and bram, press conferences and publishing parties. They all believe in “the best autumn of the times”, but the talk in the corridors is that the arrows for book sales continue to point downwards.

According to figures from the Publishers’ Association, sales of fiction went down by 13 per cent compared to the same period last year, while total book sales declined eight per cent.

According to the Bookstores Association, these figures show sales from publishers, and they think the real number of sales out of stores shows a decline of around 5 percent. The arrows have continued down this summer, and most VG have talked with the trace that it will only continue.

It is not the worst summer, but after several years of upturn, we have now had several years of decline. This is the worst half year since 2012, says CEO Trine Stensen in the Bookkeeping Association, who believes it is cause for concern.

Yes, I’m worried about the book and the reading if the exposure disappears. When the American bookstore chain Borders went bankrupt, only 50 percent of the book sales were caught by e-commerce.

Has put down stores

Norli Libris boss John Thomasgaard shares the concern and can also state that they have put down some smaller stores this year.

There are not many, but some. This is something we are now considering more when contracts expire than before. Marginal stores are exposed. We will probably get a little fewer, but a little bigger shops in the future. There is a lot to suggest that there is no room for as many bookstores as before. But this also applies to retail trade in general, says Thomasgaard, who follows the market closely.

The book market has largely declined every single month since December 2016. This has continued into 2018 and will only continue for a while. This is in many ways a reported murder, and it should not come as a big surprise to people. Actually, this decline would have come a long time, says Thomasgaard.

He believes the industry has to change in every aspect.

“We must look at how to more efficiently deliver a wide range of books to the most possible readers. It is very expensive to distribute books small and wide, says Thomasgaard
.
Does Jo Nesbø have a duty?

He does not think “the best harvest of the times” can save the development.

“No, the harvest will be good, but it’s limited what it can do with the whole market being changing. It will not be easier to be publishers in the future, we will see that smaller volumes go out to the end customer. But there will always be room for the good releases.

Some say that the decline this half year is due to not joining Nesbø with a new Harry Hole book?

“We can not put all the blame there now. But it is clear that some releases, such as Nesbø Harry Hole, Jojo Moyes’ books and ‘Fifty Shades’, reach out to completely different groups than the traditional bookkeeper group. But neither is Nesbø near any of the volumes he had when he was at the top, says Thomasgaard, who believes the reasons for the decline are compounded.

There are many factors, but there is no doubt that sound streaming services have been successful. Something goes there, something goes for other entertainment. There are relatively more people sitting with the iPad than a book now. We compete with a sea of ​​other media.

… But we hear books

The audio book streaming service Storytel can announce new records during the summer vacation, and now have 100,000 subscribers. Asking about the audio book can “save” the book industry, says CEO Håkon Havik in Storytel.no:

Yes, audiobooks can be of great help to a book market in decline. In Sweden, the book market has begun to increase again due to audiobooks, and I hope the same can happen in Norway, says Havik.

Many believe the smaller publishers will notice the decline best, and publishing director Richard Aarø in the time is worried that trends in the market represent a lasting change.

And I think that is unfortunately the case. This means tougher times and we will have to fight even harder about the customer’s time in the future, says Aarø, who believes we will see an industry changing in the future.

– Yes, to the highest degree. Change will be everyday.

He believes that growth will come within new forms of distribution.

“This may be positive for readers, but the publishers’ finances are largely based on the sale of paper books at full price, and it is enough here that the decline is most noticeable,” says Aarø.

One who does not notice the turmoil is Kari Spjeldnæs, Deputy Director in Aschehoug, who is the owner of Norli Libris. She says to VG that there is little turmoil with them, but that they have registered that the total industry figures show a decline.

“It’s not new that the retail market fluctuates with the best sellers. Maybe a very hot summer also affected book sales, says Spjeldnæs.

Norway uses approx. NOK 17 billion on integration of immigrants this year

Wednesday 15 August 2018

Overall, immigration to Norway does not pay off has been noted long ago. It is especially the integration of asylum seekers from poor and war-worn countries, which are costly, as well as bringing with it a number of challenges in other areas, such as security and security, and in matters related to cultural values.

Thursday last week, Minister of Knowledge and Integration Jan Tore Sanner (H) told TV2 that the Norwegian state spent 17 billion kroner annually on the integration of our so-called new countrymen.

Resett has been in contact with senior advisor Husejin Ajfer at the Ministry of Education to learn more about how the money is spent. Ajfer says to Resett that most of the grants in the integration area go to the municipalities, mainly as grants per immigrant.

– The municipality receives integration grants for each resident. The grant will contribute to rapid settlement and provide a reasonable coverage of the municipalities’ average additional expenses for refugees during the settlement year and the next four years. The grant will, among other things, finance the statutory introduction program, “says Ajfer.

Resett has been sent a simplified overview of how the Ministry of Education allocates integration funding this year, and it can be seen that a total of NOK 11.4 billion is spent on the ordinary integration grant. In addition, there are special grants for single minors, as well as grants for education in Norwegian and social sciences.

– The municipality receives a special grant for the settlement of single minors. The grant will help single minors to settle as quickly as possible in good living and care facilities adapted to the individual child and local conditions. The municipality also receives grants for training in Norwegian and social knowledge for adult immigrants and grants for training in Norwegian and Norwegian culture and Norwegian values ​​for asylum seekers in reception, Ajfer states.

The Resettlement overview has received shows that 2.9 billion goes to the special grants for single minors, and 2 billion is spent on grants for language, community and Norwegian education. In total, therefore, the state uses NOK 16.3 billion on grants to municipalities, which the municipalities receive per refugee.

– The grants to the municipality are funds that the municipality receives per person. For example, the municipality receives integration grants of approximately 750,000 kroner over 5 years for an adult refugee in a family. The size of the grants is therefore dependent on how many people are in the target groups of the different schemes. When the number of people to be settled or qualified goes down, then the appropriations on the posts also go down, says senior adviser Ajfer.

In addition, about 200 million go to the municipalities’ work, including qualifying refugees and area initiatives. 120 million are mainly used for grants to immigrant organizations and other volunteers. 430 million are run by the Directorate for Integration and Diversity, Competence Norway, Research and Development, Interpreting and ICT Development.

Diversity does not become a trust culture

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Hadia Tajik did not have much understanding of Norwegian culture as anything but brown cheese and something else that was intended to illustrate that we hardly own culture here in the country in a debate last autumn. As well as implicitly, therefore, there is nothing to lose in connection with Islamic immigration, so nothing worth protecting.

One to me outrageous assertion. Others protested more or less in vain with different inputs and arguments. But especially one was not powerful enough – perhaps the most important thing – something I easily remind my readers about today’s headline.

As the 80’s, I come from an earlier era when your “word” was your own honor and your reputation (in English, “Your word is your bond”), but the old-fashioned culture no longer talks about it. In many remote countries, as well as in Tajik’s Islamic country of origin, Pakistan, there is great culture. It is both intrusive and intrusive to us, now at a dangerous level – let us be completely honest and politically incorrect … For Norwegian prisons to be filled with criminal strangers, violence is a clear language, though it is deliberately covered. For no “liberal” will assert themselves responsibility or obligation.

Norway was a homogeneous, egalitarian equality society with diligent spirit that gradually becomes “population change” without the politicians having asked us through a referendum. Even when we had a vote of the European Union – and it did not matter – it was cynically overlooked as “just” advisory, and sometimes twice. The Constitution was not “tested” for any sovereignty resignation, and politicians with Gro Harlem Brundtland in the lead drove off a truly hidden EU agenda, via the EEA. Had we stayed outside this undemocratic supranational costume had much been won and / or saved us. Many were seduced with words like free trade, as well as the echo of Chamberlain’s words about no war in our day. Truth is a completely different one, yet it still runs shamelessly, in order not to admit a total political mistake.

The “colorful community” is colorful but lacks fellowship. As a young war journalist, Winston Churchill from Aden, south of the Arabian Peninsula, warned us about Islam already in 1899. Since then, the warnings have been many. But after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the collapse of communism, the overmotion took over Western Europe. Its cousin, socialism, therefore needed new content, and EU internationalism, ie our “one-world” and us controlled overnight without land borders, became the declared goals of socialists and globalists. Consequently, the national state had to be weakened to allow free movement of people and goods within the Union. Provided, demonstrable, we got drugs, criminal activities as well as foreign invaders with a primitive and violent culture.

This is simplified saying about politics thrown over our heads. The arguments varied, ranging from Ap who wanted new clients (voters), to others who put more emphasis on trade and vandalism. Someone, like me, hoped for less tax within a European regime. I was wrong, not because I am or was against taxation for the community’s best. However, because the special wealth tax was directly discriminatory against Norwegian owners, only benefit for foreign investors who did not have tax and national liability. Consequently, a number of Norwegian companies were taken over by foreigners, a particularly bad national strategy.

Diversity does not become a trust culture of, perhaps, on the contrary. We also did not get the diversity of the press support that Ap also stood behind. They have also claimed that integration is taking place. No, and again no, the truth is that Ap is not thinking of anything but its own agenda, with the “capitalist” Støre at the tip worth more than 100 million. Had he and LO been the true friend of the Norwegian workers and protects, they would take care of their own rather than immigrants. Now it is fervent for not having to admit that political power and benefits were the only thing that was going on.

It is sad to say that the Right under Erna Solberg is not much better. She lives with everyone, and is therefore the friend of the house. Worst in my opinion, she does not put the motherland first, because she does not live with Angela Merkel, who is at least smart enough to put Germany first. For her and Germans, the EU is worth gold because it gives German industry an internal market and an advantageously weak and competitive euro currency, rather than the D-mark. No wonder, Trump is bothered by the US trade deficit when, in addition, both the EU and Germany are protecting import tariffs, and hardly want to pay NATO’s defense spending.

That a bourgeois government does not clearly see the importance of the United States as a Allied, and is more diplomatic, it is strange, especially after the “money support” of the Clinton family, which many believe was pure political corruption. Both Børge Brende and our current foreign minister are like plotting parrots of course and / or as instructed by their prime minister. I also thought that if something was important for the foreign service, it was diplomacy … Unfortunately, the UD is being abused in expensive judges of domestic politics by proclaiming us a great power. In fact, we are a spur of the cranes. Not least, therefore, we are becoming “inflated” Norwegians of self-esteem.

Is it we who will integrate us in Norway?

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Smaira Iqbal, leader of the Women’s Committee in Islamic Council Norway (IRN), writes in an article in Aftenposten today about his view of the man who did not renew the temporary office when he refused to give his hand. She believes that in Norway, she must show a greater understanding of the practice of her beliefs and support his right not to take a woman in her hand. She believes that Norway must show greater tolerance.

Why should Norway show greater tolerance for a value that is not Norwegian? We are talking about immigrants to integrate in Norway. It is not Norway that will integrate for immigrants? It is highly voluntary to come and live in Norway. It is highly voluntary to stay in Norway. In Norway, Norwegian values ​​apply.

Norwegian values ​​are not Islam, halo meat, hijab or burkini. Norway is a Christian country based on Christian values. In the name of the tolerance we have accepted values ​​that are incompatible with our own. It is Norway that integrates and not the opposite. You are given a right to practice your religion privately, but if you move to a new country you must accept other ways to dress in other ways of eating and living. When moving to another country, it must be a part of the decision-making basis if you can live in another country different from the country from which you come from.

We eat halibut when we are in a Muslim country, but in Norway the meat is slaughtered in our way. When we are in Iran we dress with hijab, but not in Norway.

Children in Norway should not wear hijab. It is an assault against a young child. It is our right to decide for ourselves, to think for ourselves and to develop ourselves as we wish. It is not compatible with Norwegian values.

Dear Smaira Iqbal,

If you read this post, I wonder where is your tolerance for our values ​​that are different from yours? Are you the one who must show tolerance for the country you have moved to?

I think you should think about your values ​​and your tolerance before demanding that we tolerate more of that intolerant. It is not ethnic Norwegian that will integrate, but you who have come here will integrate you in Norway. In exactly the same way as we need to adapt when we come to your country. I have even been to school in a Muslim country and nobody is coming there who requires rights. We adapt the rules as they are in that country.

You reveal in your post that you have no intention of integrating yourself in Norway.

Appell

The debate surrounding handwriting shows very clearly why integration is not successful in Norway. It is ethnic Norwegian that will integrate and not vice versa.

The latest release to the Equality Ombudsman that it is okay for men to refuse to hand in women shows that we must fight for our values ​​in the future. It is sad that it has come as far and wrong as Hanne Bjurstrøm represents.

To support the mosques that work against Norwegian values, we must stop that.

We need new politicians, new journalists, men and women who will fight for Norway and values ​​we have built up through generations.

The Norwegian deterioration. Why do we allow it?

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

A recent taxi ride in Oslo was a selfless experience. It quickly turned out that the driver was unable to communicate with us, either in Norwegian or English.

We are still uncertain about which country he came from, but his attire and appearance suggested that he was from an African country. Eventually, we understood that he had only been here for approx. 2 months. Now the undersigned is a great supporter of newcomers to Norway to work and contribute to the community. Such initiatives are welcome. Skin color and religion are completely insignificant. But it’s important that they have the right qualifications for the job they receive.

taxi Tour

The experience of the taxi driver has raised some questions, which include qualifications and understanding of responsibilities. After blowing through two traffic lights on “reddish”, as well as having overlooked the bullying a couple of times, we demanded that he stopped so we got off. The first thought was to report them to the police and taxi center, but with a previous experience fresh in memory it was concluded that it was a waste of time. In retrospect, it turns out that declaring fallit is that one no longer cares about notifying the authorities of offenses which in the worst case can lead to death. What has happened to Norway and Norwegians? What is the reason for our ever increasing indifference?

Society and development

That’s the way development goes, said a good friend and neighbor when she was told about our experience. Yes, so that’s the reason. But, why do we allow it then? The development can be controlled! Are not we who choose which way to go? What is clear is that Norway, our country, is not able to cope with the huge ethnographic change that forces Europe through. What might be worse is that the strategy for our population increase has omitted significant measures that would have helped the transition that Norway is now in.

The northernmost people are good people who have learned about formation and behavior, which is embodied in us over generations. This has resulted in us becoming the ones we are, a peaceful people who have undergone “Norwegian” rules of conduct so that we can coexist with our countrymen in peace and tolerance. Now this image is highly threatened.

For example, a walk through Oslo city center can quickly become a risky affair. Before, it was possible that you might be young in some places late night or at night. Today, unfortunately, it applies throughout the day. What is the reason for this development? We all know the answer. An uncontrolled limit of population flow greater than what the public apparatus is able to absorb is the cause. Everybody, except the political authorities, seems to understand this. Or maybe they know it, but choose to sacrifice our society for ideological reasons or for political stools.

Where are the authorities?

Why is it, for example, that the authorities allow foreign drug traffickers to play free space in Oslo? For years, we have heard that drugs are the main cause of most of the winning crime. Why, for example, do not all these Nigerian or Eastern European drug addicts, almost taped along the sidewalk of Storgata in Oslo, from the country? What are they here to order?

The negative part of the change in society is more apparent for each day. The incomprehensible is that the authorities, those whose mission to serve and protect the people do not do what they must do. We no longer accept the argument that money is missing. Norway has surely money that is now clearly used in all political hassle around the world.

Now you could have confronted the chief of police, the mayor or even the prime minister. They would have said the same as last they talked about the issue, if they ever did. So, blah blah blah, svada. Certainly, the authorities sometimes announce one whose efforts are in various areas of justice policy. But it all seems like a kind of “ad hoc” commitment broadcast to defend its political existence and not to reassure the population.

Social Threats

So what social threats are we facing? One can mention everything from drug trafficking, foreign crimes raid across the country, outbreaks of the outcrops and luxury cars disappearing across the border, hundreds of violence against elderly and disabled people, ravages of housing and, not least, government defamation through NAV fraud. .

These criminal activities are so extensive that they even have their own weekly broadcast on TV2 with the program Åsted Norway. During the program, the audience is encouraged to call in with tips to the police about where they, as foreigners, are found to be criminals. Are we not at the wrong end of the problem here? Should not these have been stopped before they entered the country? It is a paradox that the self-evacuation started has become entertainment. We live in a country of origin.

This mindset, which for the undersigned began with a cab ride, will probably not stop before development turns. Just the idea that more of the 3,000 taxi drivers in Oslo may lack the same qualifications as the above driver is scary. Should not anyone who carries on passenger transport hold a Norwegian certificate, with a smooth running course, dark driving, that is, the whole traffic package? After all, they hold responsibility for human life during the transport mission. The reason why my driver is in the driver’s seat that day are the absent requirements Norway should have in terms of qualifications and responsibilities, the lack of control of service providers, and the total absence of respect that unfortunately many foreign cultural displays for our country and our hospitality.

“You must use the right gear to get the job done,” used an old sledge teacher to say. Now the country is approaching quickly when there is no way back. Should we really allow that to happen? It’s time to save our country. We need to get the right tool in place.

Slaves in Norway

Monday 6 August 2018

We must become harder against the hard in the face of human trafficking.

A new report from the Global Slavery Index estimates that as many as 9,000 people can live as slaves in Norway.

In the shadows of the organized Norwegian workforce there is the opposition to the Norwegian model. A working life in which people work into big debts, where immigrants are deprived of passports, are housed in small rooms and continuously monitored. Where the wages are so low that they are barely able to live off and there many simply have no choice but to listen to the boss.

This is the everyday of too many people in Norway. We know that because the so-called Lime judgment, almost 1100 pages, has given us a unique insight into the daily lives of the laborers slaves. The victims explained that they worked 12-hour days, but still got so low a salary that they were indebted to their own boss. In addition, they had to live with daily threats. One of the judges must have said about the staff that “they are dogs. They must be treated as dogs ».

Modern slavery is a deeply cynical industry that plays on people’s inner longings and dreams. Modern slave traders make use of people at their most vulnerable and livelihoods on their lack of opportunities to break out of compulsion.

Forcing people to wash cars or sell food is bad enough. But we know that a lot of human trafficking in Norway is also about forcing vulnerable women to sell sexual services. For some, every day consists of both. An apparently normal job of the day and forced prostitution as darkness settles.

Slavery has become part of our everyday lives. We see them when they are in the store, pull the street or wash the car, but we do not know who they are.

What we know, however, is that a completely different priority is needed to investigate and punish those who are looking at the people’s misfortune in this way. We also know that many of the networks that support human trafficking in Norway are international. People who come to Norway and being sentenced for human trafficking should never come in again. It’s time to tighten.

“Norway’s Magna Carta” back to Norway after 500 years

Saturday 4 August 2018

After a long life in foreignity is now the most beautiful and elaborate edition of Magnus Lagabøte’s national law back in the country.

“This edition of the National Act is equally important for people in Norway that Magna Carta is for the British,” says national librarian Aslak Sira Myhre.

He is not afraid to turn on big rum when comparing this special edition of the National Law, called Codex Hardenbergianus, with the British Constitutional Documents of 1215.

Followed by armed guards

The Landsloven Act was drafted in Bergen in 1274. The version called Codex Hardenbergianus is a particularly beautiful and costly version of Norway’s first national law, dating back to the second quarter of the 1300s. Since the 16th century it has been in Copenhagen.

Today, the national clan came back to Norway, escorted by armed guards. The National Library has signed a five-year deposit agreement with the Royal Library in Copenhagen.

“There are 31 different editions of the National Act, and they are all slightly different. But this edition has calligraphy, drawings and art that looks like it is taken from the “Rose Name”, says Aslak Sira Myhre, referring to the film and the book with action from an Italian monastery in the Middle Ages.

King Magnus Lagabøte’s national act served as a law for Norway until Christian V’s Norwegian law was introduced in 1687. Aslak Sira Myhre states that the Land Act is a unique proof of Norway’s status in the Middle Ages.

“It is based on the earlier land laws, such as Gulating and Frostating. Lagabøte collected these into one law, which in addition is based on the legislative work in Europe at that time, says the National Librarian.

Also applies today

He says that this was the second national law in Europe after the state of Castile in present Spain.

“Norway was one of the first countries to get a national law, and it was extremely modern for its time,” says Aslak Sira Myhre, indicating that it still affects us today.

– The Allemannsrätt, ie the right to go forest and land and fish and pick berries, is in the national law, thus building on principles that are older than the Viking age. This means that there is a connection between these laws and how we judge right and wrong today.

Aslak Sira Myhre says that the manuscript collection will now be kept in the security magazine under the National Library at Solli Plass in Oslo until it becomes part of the permanent exhibition that will open until autumn.

– “Lovely” to hand over it

Pernille Drost, director of the Royal Bilbiotek in Copenhagen, is very pleased that Norwegians can see book treasure in the next five years. So it’s far from a heavy heart she lends it away:

“It’s a very magnificent book and it’s nice to get it over, so Norwegians of all ages can see. I think the book with its magnificent illustrations will appeal as much to the kids as to the adults!

Norwegians among the worst in global climate change

Friday 3 August 2018

Today we have “spent up” the earth’s resources for this year. If everyone were to live like Norwegians, we would need 3.6 Earths.

Every year, the date of “Earth’s Overcrowding Day” or “Earth Overshoot Day” crawls longer and longer.

The mark, which falls this year on August 1, tells us when we have used up the Earth’s resources for the current year. The rest of the year people use natural resources that the earth needs more than a year to recover.

Earlier than ever

As last year, the date has fallen earlier than ever, as much as two months earlier than in 2000.

And Norway, like other western countries, is very poor when it comes to organic footprints. Of 134 countries as the Global Footprint Network think tank has listed, Norway is number 19.

If the whole world were to live as Norwegians, the date of Earth’s overtaking day had already fallen on April 12, or we would have needed 3.6 earthquakes in a year.

“A small proportion of the world’s population uses most of the Earth’s resources today. And it’s usually the northern and western part of the world, “says CICERO researcher Marianne Tronstad Lund.

Missing debate on division of responsibilities

Tronstad Lund points to Norway’s high gross national product and revenues as a cause of Norwegians overuse.

“It’s enough that we have a less thoughtful attitude towards use and throw. We buy things we strictly do not need, as well as having a relatively high food win.

The senior researcher thinks there is a perspective that should be highlighted in the debate on responsibilities, when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions from production and consumption:

“Norwegians are big consumers of goods produced in other countries, and we do not have to take responsibility for emissions from production in those countries.

– Should Norway take responsibility for the emissions from production in countries we import goods from?

– If we agree that those who use the service are responsible for the emissions, we should.

– It happens too little, too late

WWF World Wildlife Fund believes the reason Norway is getting out of the list to the “Global Footprint Network” is that we are not living sustainable.

“We must take it more serious that the day comes earlier and earlier each year. It’s happening too little, and it’s too late, says WWF adviser Marte Conradi.

“This year is the date one day earlier than in 2017, does it mean that it’s only one day that we begin to control overuse?

“We have reduced the overuse, but we still have not managed to reverse it, then the day had come later. We soon use resources as if we had two planets, and it’s dramatic.

Ask people to take responsability

According to Conradi, it is important that everybody takes their share of responsibility by making changes in the way we live.

“There are many small steps you can take that will contribute in general. For example, you can drive more collectively, or eat a little less meat.

“Many argue that Norwegians can not make major changes worldwide and that other countries are bigger” environmentalists “than us. What do you think about it?

“It is an argument we often hear. But the environment is just as much a collective responsibility, and the fact that someone is disgusting does not mean that we should not take our part of responsibility.

Here is the WWF World Natural Fund’s list of simple steps you can take to reduce your climate footprint:

Reduce consumption by thinking about an extra time before buying something new
Buy good quality items and repair them when it’s broken
If you have to throw something, make sure that life is recycled
Fly less privately and at work
Use public transport, the bike and the legs
Apply energy-efficient solutions in your own home and at work

Political commitment to reuse

State Secretary at the Ministry of Climate and Environment, Atle Hamar, emphasizes that Norway is the leader in climate and environmental policy.

He refers to the government’s commitment to the circular economy as an important step in reducing Norwegians’ global climate impact.

“It’s about ensuring that resources are used and reused more efficiently, which will strengthen the green competitiveness of business.

He acknowledges that it is problematic for Norwegians to travel more by air than average, but says that long-term technology development could make the aircraft industry less polluting.

“In the course of 10-15 years, we probably have electric aircraft at shorter distances. In addition, airlines use advanced biofuels that have an environmental impact.

According to Hamar, reduced emissions are also targets for several of Norway’s largest sectors.

“We have a maritime sector that is in full swing with a transition from fossil fuels to low emissions or zero emissions. In addition, Norway has taken a leading role in making the transport sector emissions-free and making it profitable to choose electric cars.

Too many immigrants outside the labor market

Tuesday, July 10, 2018


Integration minister Jan Tore Sanner must improve the introductory program, says Oslo City Council Tone Tellevik Dahl.

All newly arrived refugees are offered to participate in an integration program, whose goal is to learn Norwegian and quickly get out of work or education.

Tone Tellevik Dahl (Labor Party) believes that there are many challenges with today’s integration, and now urges the integration minister to make changes to the introduction program for refugees. The biggest challenge is that many immigrants do not get a job.

She has come up with concrete proposals for changes she has sent to integration minister Jan Tore Sanner. The municipalities need government assistance, Dahl believes.

“I hope Sanner can be positive about the changes, and we will do our best to improve implementation in general. But here we need state aid, so that we and all other municipalities are in a better position to get more into work and education, “says the agency.

– Need more time

One of the proposals for the agencies is to enable the refugees who need it to extend the introduction program to four years. Dahl says that many who come to Norway have little education, which presents challenges. These need more follow-up than others.

The Ministry of Education reports that 70 per cent of those who have come to Norway as refugees have only completed primary school or have no education in recent years.

“The challenge is that refugees who would have been very successful in four years’ races are those we find today in various measures at NAV, and who like to receive social assistance because they have not come to work,” says Dahl.

She means the money they already spend on refugees, in such cases being used in the wrong way. According to the agencies, this is a bad economy.

“Because the society was a bit too” gnawing “at the outset, we have to spend a lot to fix it later.

Big unemployment

After the refugees have participated in the integration program, one of the goals is to get them out of work or education. According to Dahl, a major problem is the unemployment of today.

Figures from the Oslo municipality show that in 2017, 54 per cent of refugees who completed the program in the municipality went to work or education.

The Ministry of Education also admits that there are some challenges with integration.

“Norway has worked well with integration compared with other European countries, but we still have a number of challenges. Many immigrants are out of work and are living in poverty, partly because they lack formal competence, State Secretary Rikke Høistad Sjøberg believes in the Ministry of Education.

Today’s working life, which still demands higher competence requirements, makes immigrants vulnerable to the labor market, according to Sjøberg.

Big differences

Sjøberg admits that there are too big differences between how the introductory program and Norwegian education work in different municipalities.

She believes that they must be better off giving children and young people who come to the country good and adapted education so they get a good education. In addition, she believes that adult immigrants must receive real and formal qualifications for working life.

There are also large variations in the results between the districts in Oslo. In 2017 in the district of Alna, 19 percent of those who completed the program went out of work. In Old Oslo, on the other hand, 65 percent were employed, figures from Oslo Municipality show.

“Equal services in all parts of the city are important to me,” says Dahl, working on a standard that will contribute to it.

Russia against the West with new weapons

Monday 9 July 2018


WRONG PLACE: Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin poses in front of sign at the airport in Longyearbyen on Svalbard. A provocation, the Norwegian authorities said. For Rogozin was unwanted in Norway after violations of international law in Ukraine. Photo: Twitter screenshot

 

Monday, January 8, 2018, Health South-East was notified of ongoing abnormal activity against computer systems throughout the region. The warning came from hospital partners who are responsible for ICT operations in the healthcare company.

The way in which the burglary was made indicated that the players were very advanced and professional. PST suspects that the attack on computer systems in Health South East is done by another state.

“We know too little about what kind of attack it is talking about and what method of intrusion used,” says Russia Expert Øystein Bogen to the magazine Vi Menn.

In February he came out with his new book “Russia’s secret war against the West”. In the book, cybercrime is one of the main themes.

“But it will not surprise me if there are Russian hackers behind. If it is the intelligence service GRU’s hackers who have done this, the Russian hybrid attacks against Norway have reached a whole new level, “said the TV 2 journalist.

Constant hybrid war

At least 20 European countries, including Norway, have been exposed to hidden Russian attempts to influence politicians’ decisions and the attitudes of the people.

With spies, state-owned hackers, organized criminals, billions of oil dollars and ice-cold cynicism, Putin is trying to break alliances and create turmoil in western countries.

– This is a hybrid war, claims Øystein Bogen.

According to Russian thinking, there is no longer any fundamental difference between war and peace. The measures (see box) should therefore be used against the country’s potential enemies constantly.

Russian scientist Tor Bukkvoll at the Norwegian Defense Research Institute agrees:

“This idea that the distinction between peace and war is gone has been around for some years,” he said.

“But we must say that the Russians believe it is the West who has wiped out the distinction. In their eyes, Western support for the people of the Middle East and Eastern Europe is warfare, “continues Bukkvoll.

He also points out that there is a danger of interpreting all Russia as hybrid warfare.

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