TOTALITARIANISM IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD

Saturday 27 October 2018

THE INFLUENCE OF NAZI GERMANY

NAZI QUOTATIONS ON ISLAM

ADOLF HITLER

“When the Mohammedans attempted to penetrate beyond France and into Central Europe during the eight century when they were driven back at battle of Tours.  Had the Arabs won this battle, the world would be Mohammedan today.  For theirs was a religion that believed in spreading the faith by sword and subjugating all nations to that faith.  The Germanic people would have become heirs to that religion.  Such a creed was perfectly suited to the Germanic temperament.”  Adolf Hitler quoted by Albert Speer, Inside the Third Reich, page 96.

“Had Charles Martel not been victorious at Poitiers, already, you see, the world had already fallen into the hands of the Jews, so gutless a thing Christianity! then we should in all probability have been converted to Mohammedanism, that cult which glorifies the heroism and which opens up the seventh Heaven to the bold warrior alone. Then the Germanic races would have conquered the world. Christianity alone prevented them from doing so.”  Adolf Hitler, August 28, 1942, midday from Hitler’s Secret Conversations, page 542)

“If a British statesman today demands that every problem concerning vital German interests should first be discussed with England, then I could make precisely the same claim and demand that every British problem must first be discussed with us. Admittedly, this Englishman would answer: Palestine is none of your business! But, just as Germany has no business in Palestine, so has England no business in the German Lebensraum! And if the problem is claimed to be a question of general rights, then I can only agree to this opinion if it were regarded as universal and obligatory. One says we had no right to do this or that. I would like to ask a counter-question: what right — just to quote only one example — has England to shoot down Arabs in Palestine, only because they are standing up for their home? Who gives England the right to do so?” — Adolf Hitler, Speech in Wilhelmshaven, Germany, April 1, 1939.

Palestine is at present occupied not by German troops but by the English; and that the country is undergoing restriction of its liberty by the most brutal resort to force, is being robbed of its independence and is suffering the cruelest maltreatment for the benefit of Jewish interlopers.  The Arabs living in that country would therefore certainly not have complained to Mr. Roosevelt of German aggression, but they are voicing a constant appeal to the world, deploring the barbarous methods with which England is attempting to suppress a people which loves its freedom and is merely defending it. … One fact is surely certain. In this case England is not defending herself against a threatened Arab attack, but as an uninvited interloper, is endeavoring to establish her power in a foreign territory which does not belong to her.” — Adolf Hitler, Speech Before the Reichstag, Berlin, Germany, April 28, 1939.

HEINRICH HIMMLER

“I hold all commanders and other SS officers, responsible for the most scrupulous and loyal respect for this privilege especially granted to the Moslems. They have answered the call of the Moslem chiefs and have come to us out of hatred for the common Jewish-Anglo-Bolshevik enemy and through respect and fidelity for he who they respect above all, the Führer, Adolf Hitler. There will no longer be the least discussion about the special rights afforded to the Moslems in these circles.”  Heinrich Himmler, on the formation of the SS Handshar (Muslim) Division, August 6, 1943.

My belief

Sunday 23 september 2018

When Jesus died, He disolved the old “order” and created a new order which born-again Christians like me believe in. Martin Luther went out of the catholic church and directed a more true belief according to the Bible. He attacked the Pope and many of the structures in the church. He cleared the path to true Christian wisdom in many ways. He wasn’t popular and had to seek cover many times, and people hid him.

3. january 1521 he was banned by the Pope. In 1522 the New Testament was finished translated from Greek to German and he and his collaborators completed the translation of the Old Testament in 1534, when the whole Bible was published. The New Testament was so popular that they had to print more editions of it.

We have many of Luthers prints in our Christian legacy, he was the founder of the evangelic lutheran church. He was a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation too.

Luther taught that salvation and, consequently, eternal life are not earned by good deeds but are received only as the free gift of God’s grace through the believer’s faith in Jesus Christ as redeemer from sin.

In 1542, Luther read a Latin translation of the Qur’an. He went on to produce several critical pamphlets on Islam, which he called “Mohammedanism”. Luther saw the Muslim faith as a tool of the devil.

Martin Luther is honored in various ways by Christian traditions coming out directly from the Protestant Reformation, i.e. Lutheranism, the Reformed tradition, and Anglicanism.

That’s what I believe in

Was Muhammad inspired by a demon rather than God?

Monday 10 september 2018

The Qur’an stands in opposition to nearly every Biblical doctrine. According to the Qur’an, Jesus was not crucified, did not rise from the dead to conquer death, man is saved on the basis of doing more good than bad, Jesus was not God but merely a prophet and not even the most significant prophet, God does not love everyone unconditionally, and the list goes on. Who would have authored a book that stands against everything God said in the Bible?

According to the Bible, it is Satan who stands in opposition to everything God said. In the Garden of Eden, he cause Eve to become confused and succumb to temptation by questioning God: “Has God really said …”. At the start of Jesus’ ministry, Satan tempted Jesus in the same way. Satan was cast out of heaven for an issue of pride, wanting to be like God himself. For that rebellion against God, he and a third of the angelic host were cast down to earth, where Satan now tries to mislead as many as possible from following God.

The Qur’an stands in opposition to God. Satan operates in opposition to God. Muhammad thought he might have encountered a demonic spirit. Does anyone notice a connection here?

Yes, I believe Muhammad likely was influenced by demonic forces. I believe the Qur’an is inspired by Satan himself. I do not believe Muhammad was visited by the angel Gabriel of the Bible but by Satan masquerading as Gabriel. The puzzle pieces all fit together. This is the only logical conclusion, given the evidence.

Which brings us to the final question. Muslims friend, what are you going to do? Who are you going to follow? Where will you spend eternity? Are you willing to risk an eternity in hell? You now have the evidence you need to make a wise choice. God will hold you accountable for what you know. You cannot claim ignorance.

Choose today whom you will serve.

Prayer Fighter!

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

God equips me now with the power to pray for others. His wisdom and love fill me all the way up now. Do not know why I got the gift. I have prayed since I was baptized in bed and the Holy Ghost took residence in me.

Now I feel that the time is right to pray for others. Prayer is an explosive in the right hands. God hears prayers and if it is His plan He will act upon them. He always does.

Prayer does not always answer, because sometimes God gives strength to endure the challenge. Feel it often in life. He gives you the opportunity to be in pain to finish it. Sometimes the pain is unbearable, you do not see Him and prayer looks useless in this. Then you will know the love that will flood over you then, it did many times when I was desperate and wanted to end my life.

He pulled me in time after time. I was in war with Him for all the pain he had allowed in my life. All he showed was love. All I showed was a hard heart.

Then came the conversation with Arvid 1. September this year. A 2 hours 32 minutes long conversation .. Then I told everything I came across in my life. He is a strong believer and will start his own congregation soon. He listened to my testimony and love to Jesus all the time since the baptism of the Spirit came to me.

Now the hours go for praying for others. They are in my heart and I take great care of them.

God is love, Jesus is our contact with the King. Without Jesus no contact.

What does it mean that God is love?

Sunday 2 September 2018

uestion: “What does it mean that God is love?”

Answer: Let’s look at how the Bible describes love, and then we will see a few ways in which God is the essence of love. “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails” (1 Corinthians 13:4-8a). This is God’s description of love, and because God is love (1 John 4:8), this is what He is like.

Love (God) does not force Himself on anyone. Those who come to Him do so in response to His love. Love (God) shows kindness to all. Love (Jesus) went about doing good to everyone without partiality. Love (Jesus) did not covet what others had, living a humble life without complaining. Love (Jesus) did not brag about who He was in the flesh, although He could have overpowered anyone He ever came in contact with. Love (God) does not demand obedience. God did not demand obedience from His Son, but rather, Jesus willingly obeyed His Father in heaven. “The world must learn that I love the Father and that I do exactly what my Father has commanded me” (John 14:31). Love (Jesus) was/is always looking out for the interests of others.

The greatest expression of God’s love is communicated to us in John 3:16: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” Romans 5:8proclaims the same message: “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” We can see from these verses that it is God’s greatest desire that we join Him in His eternal home, heaven. He has made the way possible by paying the price for our sins. He loves us because He chose to as an act of His will. Love forgives. “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

So, what does it mean that God is love? Love is an attribute of God. Love is a core aspect of God’s character, His Person. God’s love is in no sense in conflict with His holiness, righteousness, justice, or even His wrath. All of God’s attributes are in perfect harmony. Everything God does is loving, just as everything He does is just and right. God is the perfect example of true love. Amazingly, God has given those who receive His Son Jesus as their personal Savior the ability to love as He does, through the power of the Holy Spirit (John 1:121 John 3:123-24).

10 Things You Should Know about the Love of God

Sunday 2 September 2018

1. God’s love is incomprehensible.

No human mind can comprehend God. We cannot define God. We cannot provide a comprehensive account of who he is. He “dwells in unapproachable light” (1 Tim. 6:16). If God is incomprehensible, then so is his love. While we may and must speak truthfully about his love, we can never fathom it, because it is divine love, as different from our love as his being is different from our being.

2. God’s love can be known.

We cannot define God in the sense of delimiting exhaustively who he is, but we can nonetheless describe him truthfully. We can do so because he has made himself known to us in his Word and he opens our eyes to that Word by his Spirit. How is that possible, given the divine difference? It is possible because God makes himself known to us in creaturely reality. He takes up the things he has made and uses them to describe himself to us. Thus he is a lion, a rock, fire, even moth and dry rot (look it up!).

3. God is known by analogy.

When God uses created things like lions to speak about himself in the Bible he is speaking analogically. This means that the things he uses to describe himself are neither identical with him, nor utterly different from him. He is a rock, for example, not because he is made of stone. When he says “rock” of himself, we are not to map all the rockiness of a rock onto him point-for-point. But nor are we to think that he is he entirely unrocky, discontinuous in every way with rocks. When he says that he is a rock he means some of what we mean when we say that a rock is a rock: he is not made of stone, but he is solid and reliable. How is it possible for created things to image God for us like this? It is possible precisely because he created them. It is as if his fingerprints are left on the things he has made, so that each of them contains a pale reflection of some of his divine attributes. Our fallen minds cannot piece together a picture of God from what he has made—indeed we suppress his natural revelation—but in his inspired Word he himself can use those things to describe himself, and then he can illuminate our minds to understand and believe those descriptions. This all applies to God’s love: when we read “God is love” we know something of what love is from what he has made, but his love is never to be identified point-for-point with any created love that we already know.

4. The pictures of God in the Bible regulate themselves, including pictures of his love.

A pressing question then arises: how do we know which aspects of each picture that God draws of himself we are to apply to him and which we are not? How do we know that we are not to infer that his love might ebb and flow as human love can, even that it might fail? This may seem obvious to us, but that is only because we have to some extent already learned how to read the Bible properly. What, when we stop and think about it, is the reason that we do not infer this? The reason is that other ways in which God describes himself prevent us doing so—for example, his repeated self-description as a covenant-keeping God who makes solemn oaths to his people. The Bible is a self-interpreting book: what it says in one part shows us how we are to read another part. Its many pictures of God form a self-interpreting mesh of images. And that includes its pictures of his love.

5. We quickly leap to the wrong conclusions about God’s love.

We are often less alert to the ways in which the love language is to be interpreted in the light of God’s other descriptions of himself. This comes out very clearly when someone says something like, “If I were a God of love then I . . . ” The reasoning that follows is usually untethered from God’s wider portrayal of himself in Scripture. When we do this God becomes in effect just a massive projection of our own selves, a shadow cast onto a screen behind us with all of our own features magnified and exaggerated. Whereas it may be immediately obvious to us that God will not decide to stop loving us, for some reason it is less obvious that his love is different from our love in other ways, such as in being self-sufficient, sovereign, unchanging, all-knowing, just, and passionless (yes, rightly understood).

6. God’s love must be “read” within the rest of what Scripture teaches about his divine attributes.

We are not free to pick up the ball of “God is love” and run with it wherever we will. The statement must remain tethered within its immediate context in 1 John 4, within the broader context of John’s writings, and within the ultimate context of God’s entire self-description in Scripture. The local context immediately reminds us (in verse 10) of the connection between love and propitiation, which requires that we understand God’s love alongside his justice and wrath. The ultimate context of Scripture will bring alongside his love all of the other attributes of God. Together they will form a self-regulating mesh of meaning.

7. God’s love must be “read” especially within what Scripture teaches about his triune life.

Further, the wider context in John’s writings will repeatedly connect the love of God to his triune life. John delights to write of the Father’s love for the Son and the Son’s love for the Father. He even records the Lord Jesus saying that the Father loves him because he lays down his life (John 10:17). Love is not unique for being a trinitarian attribute: all the attributes of God are the attributes of the one God who is three persons, but we must never miss the trinitarian character of the love of God.

8. Reading God’s love in its wider context keeps us from error.

Love is perhaps the most obvious attribute for consideration from a trinitarian perspective, but we more readily observe that than grasp the theological consequences of it. What a difference it will make if, for example, we recall that the love of God is rooted in the Father’s love for his Son and his resulting will to see the Son honored (John 5:22–23). Then we will not infer from “God is love” that he easily overlooks sin, because we will grasp that Christ-dishonoring sin is itself an offense against the very heart of God’s love. From God’s love for his Son will follow his wrath against sinners. It is only when we read the love of God like this that we will be prevented from reaching false conclusions from it by making our own natural minds the context in which we interpret it.

9. Understanding the different manner of God’s love helps us to see its immeasurable magnitude.

The consideration of the love of God in its proper biblical contexts is not an exercise in abstraction of interest only to obscurantist systematic theologians. It may be easier just to think “God is love” and to fill that statement with whatever our human minds suggest. Certainly it requires less mental effort just to let our own minds generate our theology, rather than to subject them to the disciplined study of God’s self-revelation in Scripture. But at the end of the day a god who is little more than a projection of my own mind can never satisfy me. Worshipping such a god would be like being locked in a room with only myself as company, a kind of theological solitary confinement, a terrible narcissistic solipsism, and ultimately a form of self-worshipping idolatry akin in some ways to hell itself. There is no satisfaction on this road, only bitter disappointment. It is meditation on the authoritative self-revelation of God in its fullness that will bring rest for our souls, the rest of finding in him one who infinitely exceeds our own puny finitude, one whose delights can never be exhausted.

10. God’s love truly perceived always draws out from us a response of love.

The contemplation of divine love in its biblical fullness is never something that ends in itself. Our rest in God never finds its fulfillment in ourselves but always leads us out of ourselves toward him and toward others. The love of God is to be lived as well as learned. The love of God for us begets love in us for him and for others. The true Word of love that we have in the Bible, if we have it truly, will abide in us, and will not return empty as, by miracles of grace, we make glancing reflections of the immeasurable love of God visible to others in our own lives.

Fear of the Lord: What Does It Mean?

One biblical phrase that has troubled many people is the command to fear God. What does “fear of the Lord” mean, and why does God ask us to fear Him?

We fear many bad things: Crime, auto accidents, devastating storms, West Nile virus, chemical weapons, mass murderers, terrorists, earthquakes, demons and Satan himself!

But our loving Heavenly Father? Why would God tell us to fear Him?

Wrong fear

First, realize that there is a fear of God that doesn’t produce good results. This terrifying and paralyzing fear is likely the type of fear that comes to mind for many.

The Bible shows several examples of fear gone wrong. Consider these passages:

  • “You believe that there is one God. You do well. Even the demons believe—and tremble!” (James 2:19).
  • The unprofitable servant was corrected for being wicked and lazy after he made the excuse, “I was afraid, and went and hid your talent in the ground” instead of using it productively (Matthew 25:25).
  • Revelation 21:8 even tells us the “cowardly” or “fearful” (King James Version) will not be in God’s Kingdom.

Such fear does not have a positive end. Obviously this fear is not what God is looking for. So what type of fear does God want us to have?

Meaning of the fear of the Lord

The main Hebrew and Greek words translated fear in the Bible can have several shades of meaning, but in the context of the fear of the Lord, they convey a positive reverence.

The Hebrew verb yare can mean “to fear, to respect, to reverence” and the Hebrew noun yirah “usually refers to the fear of God and is viewed as a positive quality. This fear acknowledges God’s good intentions (Ex. 20:20). … This fear is produced by God’s Word (Ps. 119:38Prov. 2:5) and makes a person receptive to wisdom and knowledge (Prov. 1:79:10)” (Warren Baker and Eugene Carpenter, The Complete Word Study Dictionary: Old Testament, 2003, pp. 470-471).

The Greek noun phobos can mean “reverential fear” of God, “not a mere ‘fear’ of His power and righteous retribution, but a wholesome dread of displeasing Him” (Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, 1985, “Fear, Fearful, Fearfulness”). This is the type of positive, productive fear Luke describes in the early New Testament Church:

“Then the churches throughout all Judea, Galilee, and Samaria had peace and were edified. And walking in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, they were multiplied” (Acts 9:31, emphasis added).

One resource includes this helpful summary: “The fear of God is an attitude of respect, a response of reverence and wonder. It is the only appropriate response to our Creator and Redeemer” (Nelson’s NKJV Study Bible, 1997, note on Psalm 128:1).

Purpose of fear

If you study the Bible, there is no mistaking the repeated commands to fear God. Wise King Solomon put it this way in explaining his reason for writing the book of Proverbs: “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge” (Proverbs 1:7).

Why? Consider these words of the psalmist: “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom; a good understanding have all those who do His commandments. His praise endures forever” (Psalm 111:10).

In Psalm 34 King David also tells us about learning the fear of the Lord: “Come, you children, listen to me; I will teach you the fear of the LORD. … Keep your tongue from evil, and your lips from speaking deceit. Depart from evil and do good; seek peace and pursue it” (verses 11, 13-14).

A healthy fear of God includes the fear of the consequences of disobedience. There may be times of temptation or trial when we may forget some of the better reasons for obeying God, and that is when we had better think of the consequences (Exodus 20:20).

This is what Hebrews 10:26-31 tells us: “For if we sin willfully after we have received the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, but a certain fearful expectation of judgment, and fiery indignation which will devour the adversaries. Anyone who has rejected Moses’ law dies without mercy on the testimony of two or three witnesses.

“Of how much worse punishment, do you suppose, will he be thought worthy who has trampled the Son of God underfoot, counted the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified a common thing, and insulted the Spirit of grace? For we know Him who said, ‘Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,’ says the Lord. And again, ‘The LORD will judge His people.’ It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.”

Reverence of God helps us to take Him and His beneficial laws seriously. Being in harmony with the spiritual laws that govern the universe has astounding benefits. Many of these come in this life, but the greatest benefits will be experienced in the life to come (1 Timothy 4:8Psalm 16:11).

Family rules

Consider this biblical analogy: Children learn their family rules partly through fear of correction (Hebrews 12:9-11). Of course, when they grow older, they should continue to follow the rules out of love.

God, whose family rules are even more important, also trains us to obey for our own good.

As incredible as it sounds, God wants us to actually be His children!

But we live in a world that is deceived and ruled by Satan. So we must come out of Satan’s ways—we must not be children of Satan (John 8:44). Instead we should learn the way of God’s family—the way of love. God is love (1 John 4:8), and His laws can be summarized as love for God and love for fellow man (Matthew 22:37-40).

Forgiveness and the fear of the Lord

Sadly, however, everyone sins and earns the death penalty. If everyone is just going to die forever, what would be the purpose of fear? Sure, we might be depressed and terrified, but is that what God really wants?

Consider this fascinating passage: “If You, LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared” (Psalm 130:3-4).

God’s offer of forgiveness to those who repent gives us a reason to fear—a reason to change. It also gives us a reason to be eternally grateful and to grow in love to be more like our loving God!

How does love cast out fear?

The reverential fear of the Lord is designed to help us grow to become more like God—to grow in love. And this growth removes any need to be terrified of God’s judgment. As the apostle John put it:

“Love has been perfected among us in this: that we may have boldness in the day of judgment; because as He is, so are we in this world. There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love” (1 John 4:17-18).

A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature by Arndt and Gingrich gives an excellent explanation of the use of phobos in verse 18. In the specific context of the verse, the meaning is “slavish fear … which is not to characterize the Christian’s relation to God.”

The same shade of meaning is applied to the word fear in Romans 8:15, “For you did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out, ‘Abba, Father.’” Though we are to voluntarily yield ourselves as bond servants or slaves to God, He is not an abusive, cruel slave driver who terrorizes and torments us, which is the point of this verse.

Some misunderstand and think that love casts out not only fear but law. However, John explains that God’s laws actually define God’s love:

“For this is the love of God, that we keep His commandments. And His commandments are not burdensome” (1 John 5:3). This connection between God’s love and His 10 Commandments is also made clear in Paul’s writings and the Gospels (Romans 13:9-10; Matthew 22:37-40).

God wants His laws written on our hearts. For example, even if we had no fear of being caught, we should choose to never steal from others—because we love them and God.

We must never lose our respect and appreciation for God, but we should grow beyond being motivated solely by fear and rather be motivated by God’s love—having a deep love and respect for God and His words.

A different Greek word for fear is found in 2 Timothy 1:7: “For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind.” The Greek deilia means “cowardice, timidity, fearfulness” (Spiros Zodhiates, The Complete Word Study New Testament). Deilia is consistently used in a negative manner, unlike phobos. Revelation 21:8, referred to earlier, uses deilos, the adjective form of this word.

Eternal benefits of the fear of the Lord

So, rather than a paralyzing terror, the positive fear of the Lord taught in the Bible is a key element in change. It helps us have a proper, humble perspective of ourselves in relation to our awesome God; it helps us in times of temptation when we need to remember the serious consequences of disobeying God; and it motivates us to become more like our loving Creator.

By doing these things, the fear of the Lord helps bring eternal benefits:

  • “Do not let your heart envy sinners, but be zealous for the fear of the LORD all the day; for surely there is a hereafter, and your hope will not be cut off” (Proverbs 23:17-18).
  • “The fear of the LORD is a fountain of life, to turn one away from the snares of death” (Proverbs 14:27).
  • “The fear of the LORD leads to life, and he who has it will abide in satisfaction; he will not be visited with evil” (Proverbs 19:23).

Five Great Bible Covenants

Sunday 2 september 2018

by David Padfield

In form, a covenant is an agreement between two people and involves promises on the part of each to the other. The concept of a covenant between God and His people is one of the central themes of the Bible. In the Biblical sense, a covenant implies much more than a contract or a simple agreement between two parties.

The word for “covenant” in the Old Testament also provides additional insight into the meaning of this important idea. It comes from a Hebrew root word that means “to cut.” This explains the strange custom of two people passing through the cut bodies of slain animals after making an agreement (cf. Jer. 34:18). A ceremony such as this always accompanied the making of a covenant in the Old Testament. Sometimes those entering into a covenant shared a meal, such as when Laban and Jacob made their covenant (Gen. 31:54).

Abraham and his children were commanded to be circumcised as a “sign of covenant” between them and God (Gen. 17:10-11).

At Sinai, Moses sprinkled the blood of animals on the altar and upon the people who entered into covenant with God (Exo. 24:3-8).

The Old Testament contains many examples of covenants between people who related to each other as equals. For example, David and Jonathan entered into a covenant because of their love for each other—this agreement bound each of them to certain responsibilities (1 Sam. 18:3).

The remarkable thing is that God is holy, omniscient, and omnipotent; but He consents to enter into covenant with man, who is feeble, sinful, and flawed.

In this article, we want to examine five great covenants of the Bible.

God’s Covenant With Noah

Centuries before the time of Abraham, God made a covenant with Noah, assuring Noah that He would never again destroy the world by flood (Gen. 9).

Noah lived at a time when the whole earth was filled with violence and corruption—yet Noah did not allow the evil standards of his day to rob him of fellowship with God. He stood out as the only one who “walked with God” (Gen. 6:9), as was also true of his great-grandfather Enoch (Gen. 5:22). “Noah was a just man, perfect in his generations” (Gen. 6:9). The Lord singled out Noah from among all his contemporaries and chose him as the man to accomplish a great work.

When God saw the wickedness that prevailed in the world (Gen. 6:5), He told Noah of His intention to destroy the ancient world by a universal flood. God instructed Noah to build an ark (a large barge) in which he and his family would survive the universal deluge. Noah believed God and “according to all that God commanded him, so he did” (Gen. 6:22).

Noah is listed among the heroes of faith. “By faith Noah, being divinely warned of things not yet seen, moved with godly fear, prepared an ark for the saving of his household, by which he condemned the world and became heir of the righteousness which is according to faith” (Heb. 11:7).

With steadfast confidence in God, Noah started building the ark. During this time, Noah continued to preach God’s judgment and mercy, warning the ungodly of their approaching doom. Peter reminds us of how God “did not spare the ancient world, but saved Noah, one of eight people, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood on the world of the ungodly” (2 Pet. 2:5).

Noah preached for 120 years, apparently without any converts. At the end of that time, “when … the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah … eight souls were saved through water” (1 Pet. 3:20).

People continued in their evil ways and ignored his pleadings and warnings until the flood overtook them. When the ark was ready, Noah entered in with all kinds of animals “and the Lord shut him in” (Gen. 7:16), cut off completely from the rest of mankind.

Noah was grateful to the Lord who had delivered him from the flood. After the flood, he built an altar to God (Gen. 8:20) and made a sacrifice, which was accepted graciously, for in it “the Lord smelled a soothing aroma” (Gen. 8:21).

The Lord promised Noah and his descendants that He would never destroy the world again with a universal flood (Gen. 9:15). The Lord made an everlasting covenant with Noah and his descendants, establishing the rainbow as the sign of His promise (Gen. 9:1-17).

Another part of the covenant involved the sanctity of human life, i.e., that “whoever sheds man’s blood, by man his blood shall be shed; for in the image of God He made man” (Gen. 9:6). Every time we see a rainbow today we are reminded of that agreement—this covenant has not been done away with. As long as God still sends rainbows after a storm, capital punishment will still be a part of God’s law for the human race.

God’s Covenant With Abraham

In making a covenant with Abraham, God promised to bless his descendants and make them His own special people—in return, Abraham was to remain faithful to God and to serve as a channel through which God’s blessings could flow to the rest of the world (Gen. 12:1-3).

Abraham’s story begins with his passage with the rest of his family from Ur of the Chaldeans in ancient southern Babylonia (Gen. 11:31). He and his family moved north along the trade routes of the ancient world and settled in the prosperous trade center of Haran, several hundred miles to the northwest.

While living in Haran, at the age of 75, Abraham received a call from God to go to a strange, unknown land that God would show him. The Lord promised Abraham that He would make him and his descendants a great nation (Gen. 12:1-3). The promise must have seemed unbelievable to Abraham because his wife Sarah was childless (Gen. 11:30-31; 17:15). Abraham obeyed God with no hint of doubt or disbelief.

Abraham took his wife and his nephew, Lot, and went toward the land that God would show him. Abraham moved south along the trade routes from Haran, through Shechem and Bethel, to the land of Canaan. Canaan was a populated area at the time, inhabited by the war-like Canaanites; so, Abraham’s belief that God would ultimately give this land to him and his descendants was an act of faith.

The circumstances seemed quite difficult, but Abraham’s faith in God’s promises allowed him to trust in the Lord. In Genesis 15, the Lord reaffirmed His promise to Abraham. The relationship between God and Abraham should be understood as a covenant relationship—the most common form of arrangement between individuals in the ancient world. In this case, Abraham agreed to go to the land that God would show him (an act of faith on his part), and God agreed to make Abraham a great nation (Gen. 12:1-3).

In Genesis 15 Abraham became anxious about the promise of a nation being found in his descendants because of his advanced age—and the Lord then reaffirmed the earlier covenant. A common practice of that time among heirless families was to adopt a slave who would inherit the master’s goods. Therefore, because Abraham was childless, he proposed to make a slave, Eliezer of Damascus, his heir (Gen. 15:2). But God rejected this action and challenged Abraham’s faith: “‘Look now toward heaven, and count the stars if you are able to number them.’ And He said to him, ‘So shall your descendants be'” (Gen. 15:5).

Abraham’s response is the model of believing faith: “And he believed in the Lord, and He accounted it to him for righteousness” (Gen. 15:6). The rest of Genesis 15 consists of a ceremony between Abraham and God that was commonly used in the ancient world to formalize a covenant (Gen. 15:7-21). God repeated this covenant to Abraham’ son, Isaac (Gen. 17:19). Stephen summarized the story in the book of Acts 7:1-8.

The Mosaic Covenant

The Israelites moved to Egypt during the time of Joseph. A new Pharaoh came upon the scene and turned the Israelites into common slaves. The people cried out to the God of their forefathers. “So God heard their groaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob” (Exo. 2:24). After a series of ten plagues upon the land of Egypt, God brought the Israelites out “of Egypt with great power and with a mighty hand” (Exo. 32:11).

Three months after leaving the land of Egypt, the children of Israel camped at the base of Mount Sinai (Exo. 19:1). God promised to make a covenant with the Israelites (Exo. 19:3-6). Before they even knew the conditions of the contract, the people agreed to abide by whatever God said (Exo. 19:8).

This covenant was between God and the people of Israel—you and I are not a party in this contract (and never have been). The Ten Commandments are the foundation of the covenant, but they are not the entirety of it.

After giving the first ten commands, the people asked the Lord to speak no more (Exo. 20:18-20). Moses then drew near to the presence of God to hear the rest of the covenant (Exo. 20:21). After receiving the Law, Moses spoke the words of the covenant to all of the people, and the people agreed to obey (Exo. 24:4).

Moses then wrote the conditions of the covenant down, offered sacrifices to God, and then sprinkled both the book and the people with blood to seal the covenant (Exo. 24:8). This covenant between God and the people of Israel was temporary—God promised a day when He would make a new covenant, not only with Israel but also with all mankind. “Behold, the days are coming, says the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah—not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day that I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt, My covenant which they broke, though I was a husband to them, says the Lord. But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord: I will put My law in their minds, and write it on their hearts; and I will be their God, and they shall be My people” (Jer. 31:31-34).

God’s Covenant With David

Another covenant was between God and King David, in which David and his descendants were established as the royal heirs to the throne of the nation of Israel (2 Sam. 7:12-13).

This covenant agreement reached its fulfillment when Jesus, a descendant of the line of David, was born in Bethlehem. The gospel of Matthew starts off by showing Christ was “the Son of David” (Matt. 1:1), and thus He had the right to rule over God’s people. Peter preached that Jesus Christ was a fulfillment of God’s promise to David (Acts 2:29-36).

The Covenant Of Christ

The New Testament makes a clear distinction between the covenants of the Mosaic Law and the covenant of Promise. The apostle Paul spoke of these “two covenants,” one originating “from Mount Sinai,” the other from “the Jerusalem above” (Gal. 4:24-26). Paul also argued that the covenant established at Mount Sinai was a “ministry of death” and “condemnation” (2 Cor. 3:7, 9).

The death of Christ ushered in the new covenant under which we are justified by God’s grace and mercy—it is now possible to have the true forgiveness of sins. Jesus Himself is the Mediator of this better covenant between God and man (Heb. 9:15). Jesus’ sacrificial death served as the oath, or pledge, which God made to us to seal this new covenant.

The “new covenant” is the new agreement God has made with mankind, based on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The concept of a new covenant originated with the promise of Jeremiah that God would accomplish for His people what the old covenant had failed to do (Jer. 31:31-34; Heb. 11:7-13). Under this new covenant, God would write His Law on human hearts.

When Jesus ate the Passover meal at the Last Supper with His disciples, He spoke of the cup and said, “this is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matt. 26:28). Luke’s account refers to this cup as symbolizing “the new covenant in My blood, which is shed for you” (Luke 22:20).

When Paul recited the account he had received concerning the Last Supper, he quoted these words of Jesus about the cup as “the new covenant in My blood” (1 Cor. 11:25).

The Epistle to the Hebrews gives the new covenant more attention than any other book in the New Testament. It quotes the entire passage from Jeremiah 31:31-34 (Heb. 8:8-12). Jesus is referred to by the writer of Hebrews as “the Mediator of the new covenant” (Heb. 9:15; 12:24). The new covenant, a “better covenant … established on better promises” (Heb. 8:6), rests directly on the sacrificial work of Christ.

The new covenant accomplished what the old could not, i.e., the removal of sin and cleansing of the conscience (Heb. 10:2, 22). The work of Jesus Christ on the cross thus makes the old covenant “obsolete” (Heb. 8:13) and fulfills the promise of the prophet Jeremiah.

Conclusion

Unlike the Mosaic covenant, the new covenant of Jesus Christ is intended for all mankind—regardless of race. In the Great Commission Jesus sent His apostles into the entire world so they could tell the story of the cross (Luke 24:46-47; Matt. 28:18-20). The gospel call extends to every man and woman today!

Are we motivated to defend ourselves against Muhammad’s soldiers?

August 30, 2018

The Prophet Muhammad forced his neighbors to believe in him by the sword. In Norway, people in hijab, burka, niqab and other religious Islamic uniforms would do the same if they had the opportunity. The question is, is Norway well motivated to defend us against Muhammad’s soldiers?

Leyla Hasic is a spokeswoman in the Islamic Council of Norway and uses Niqab, and Bjørn Harald Hegreberg Garborg leads the student parliament at Oslo Met. Both are engaged in the discussion of banning face-covering garments.

I think it’s sad that Leyla Hasic, in a young and strong age, makes a spokeswoman for ideologies that hold women down, instead of enlightening the world with the love of Allah. She could fight for something more important. However, a conservative Islamist will always confirm the Quran’s narratives that women are slaves both here on earth and up there with Allah. Unfortunately.

Fresh air is needed in conservative environments. Such environment is hazardous to health. You get sick without noticing it. The dark forest that the religious leaders have pushed millions of young people deep into is full of poisonous plants.

I wish that Leyla Hasic and others in her situation could be released from captivity. There are many who have locked themselves into Islam’s cage in the hope of a better life up there with Allah. Some people feel outside and feel welcome in the community they live in. One may feel that one’s voice is not being listened to, and then it may be tempting to choose an aggressive way of attention. Like to fully cover.

If you want to show the world who you are, Leyla Hasic, you must show yourself. Tell about your dreams, thoughts and ideas by making yourself visible as the sun. Let your heart warm the hearts of others with true love. It will make Allah very happy.

The train still has not left you, and you have many opportunities to fill the days with good deeds. Just open the heart completely and let the love flow. You do not have to hide behind big black clothes. It gives no pleasure.

Garborg, the chairman of the student parliament at Oslo Met, will meet in Finland’s hood if someone is thrown out of teaching because of the ban on face-covering garments. If this is correct, it’s just sad – a misunderstood “solidarity”.

Bjørn Harald Hegreberg Garborg needs help filling the heart and the brain with knowledge of Islam. It is dangerous to believe in the Islamists’ version of religion. They condemn an ​​unfeigned Islam, and it’s just nonsense when they talk about mercy on women.

An example: In Egypt, female television programmers were forced to use hijab. Many of them were threatened with life if they threw the hijab. Killing in Allah’s name happens to women all over the world on a daily basis. In Iraq, Christian women are killed, including in Basrah where I come from.

The Hijab phenomenon has many historical explanations. Throughout the ages, the garment has been used to signal different things; like the woman do not want to marry that you are over a certain age, that you are not interested in sex that the men should abstain that the woman is not for a slave for sale or as protection for example to hide from watchers while in the mosque, etc. The Islamic uniforms we now see most were created by Umar ibn al-Khattab (581-644), not by Allah.

In Umar ibn al-Khattab’s time, women who did not use hijab were not free women. They were women who could be sold and bought entirely legally by businessmen, powermen and the rich. Do Norwegians know that Umar ibn al-Khattab ran for women who went without hijab and whipped them in front of everyone on Mekkas square? Many Muslims do not know that either. Many should therefore take the time to read the Hadiths.

Many Norwegians try to be kind, warmhearted, merciful, democratic and liberal by defending the Islamic uniforms. Do Norwegians understand that their ignorant attitudes harm us who have fled from the false values ​​of Islamists?

Every time we see men in holy jihadist uniforms (a kind of robe that stops in the bones of non-Muslim countries), we know that these men send a message that they believe that the society in which we live is a horde community. Let us not have to accept that Islamists define us as uncle and unbelief.

I hope my chronicle gets Norwegian politicians, as well as young men and women who blindly listen to religious leaders to use their heads. I ask you to focus on the truth and stop taking into account what conservative religious people want and want. Let’s be a free society that does not force people into a crowded cage of hijabs, burcas, niqabs and other religious uniforms.

Hareide disagrees with his own deputy head of the Parliament on homosexuality

Thursday, 23 August 2018

KrF’s breakdown Hans Fredrik Grøvan believes that the gay marriage should have been undone. Now KrF leader Knut Arild Hareide clarifies that he disagrees.

It has created waves in KrF that the party’s family and marriage spokesman Geir Jørgen Bekkevold was a priest in a gay wedding this summer. It has been so far that people in central office have asked the spokesman to go and over 100 members have signed out.

The prominent KrF tops and parliamentary deputy Hans Fredrik Grøvan have said that the wedding ceremony “should have been undone”. KrF leader Knut Arild Hareide has not yet wanted to go out and support Bekkevold and the wedding ceremony.

But at the NRK Political Quarter radio program on Thursday morning, Hareide says he has full confidence in Bekkevold as a family spokesperson.

“This is a decision that Geir Jørgen Bekkevold takes as a priest. And to get up in what he does as a priest, I think it’s going to be completely wrong, “Hareide told the NRK program.
– Your agent says that this should have been recorded internally in the party and that it should be unsettled, ask the programmer.

– I disagree with that.

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