Deaths in Norway attack came from stab wounds, not bow and arrow, police say

OSLO, Oct 18 (Reuters) – Five people killed in a small Norwegian town last week were all stabbed to death and not shot with a bow and arrows as initially suspected, police said on Monday.

Four women and one man, aged between 52 and 78-years-old, were killed in the Oct. 13 attacks in Kongsberg, a town about 70 km (40 miles) west of the capital Oslo.

https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/deaths-norway-attack-came-stab-wounds-not-bow-arrow-police-say-2021-10-18/

Spanish volcano activity in La Palma island intensifies

Spanish volcano activity in La Palma island intensifies, suspending flights and forcing more evacuations

Madrid (CNN) — Officials on the Spanish island of La Palma have ordered more evacuations on the sixth consecutive day of eruptions from the Cumbre Vieja volcano. Flights to and from the island have been canceled because of volcanic ash.

The secret lives of Neanderthal children

Among the growing collection of Neanderthal remains to be discovered are fossilised bones belonging to children. Now we are gaining unprecedented insights into what being a young Neanderthal was like.
In any normal summer, Spain’s famous Playa de la Castilla – a perfect 20km (12 mile) long stretch of sand backed by the Doñana nature reserve and close to the resort of Matalascañas, Huelva – would have been covered by the footprints of visiting tourists. But in June 2020 with international flights banned due to Covid-19, the beach was uncharacteristically quiet. Two biologists – María Dolores Cobo and Ana Mateos – who were strolling along the peaceful beach, nonetheless found many footprints. These, however, were made by a very different kind of visitor.

What it’s really like to negotiate with ransomware attackers

The most critical moment in a ransomware negotiation usually comes long before the victim and the hackers discuss a price.

By the time the two sides start talking, the hackers have already gained significant control of a company’s network, most likely securing access to sensitive account data, business contracts, and other key details of an organization. The more they steal, the greater the leverage they have.
The only way for the victim to regain some ground, cybersecurity experts say, is to come armed with information about how much the hackers have really stolen and knowledge of the attackers’ past negotiating tactics.

White House turns up heat on Big Tech

White House turns up heat on Big Tech’s Covid ‘disinformation dozen’

The White House turned up the pressure on Silicon Valley to get a handle on vaccine misinformation Thursday, specifically singling out 12 people one group dubbed the “disinformation dozen,” saying they were responsible for a great deal of misinformation about Covid-19.

“There’s about 12 people who are producing 65% of anti-vaccine misinformation on social media platforms,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Thursday.

Seriously, stop sharing your vaccine cards on social media

When one of my editors recently shared a celebratory picture of his vaccine card on Instagram, I sent him a direct message: “Didn’t you read our story about not posting your record? Scammers are watching!”

He argued they’d be hard pressed to dupe him based on anything listed on the card: “What scam are you gonna run on me just by knowing my name and my birthday? Unless it’s that you sign up for free ice cream scoops on my birthday and don’t give them to me in which case, yes, that is very serious.”
But it’s not just his birthday that was listed. The card showed medically sensitive information, including his vaccine lot number, clinic location and the brand of vaccination received. And for some people, the card contains even more.

The pandemic forced a massive remote-work experiment

Now comes the hard part


It’s been one year since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic and businesses started closing. CNN Business looks back on the pandemic’s impact on the global workforce and how things may have forever changed.

In March 2020, companies across the US abruptly shuttered their offices and instructed employees to work from home indefinitely as a result of the pandemic.

At first, many thought the shutdowns would last a couple months. But one year later, millions of workers are still working remotely.
The pandemic has forced a large segment of the global workforce to go through a remote-work experiment on a scale never seen before — and a lot has changed in the last 12 months.
The boundary between our work and our personal lives has become blurred. Working at the kitchen table has become common and, for parents, juggling virtual school while trying to hit work deadlines has become a daily challenge.

What will travel look like when the pandemic is over?

As the world ground to a halt last March, many travelers expected to be globetrotting again in a few months time.
Here we are just over a year later.
But with the rapid development of effective vaccines and increased distribution of those life-saving doses in some countries, glimmers of hope are starting to emerge.

International spectators will be refused entry into Japan for Tokyo 2021

nternational spectators will be refused entry into Japan for this summer’s Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee said in a statement on Saturday.

Any tickets bought by overseas residents for the postponed Games, scheduled to begin on July 23, will be refunded.
The decision was taken following a virtual meeting between the “Five Parties” — the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (TMG), the Organizing Committee Tokyo 2020 and the Government of Japan — with the IOC and IPC saying they “fully respect and accept this conclusion.”

Inside Russia’s deep frozen ghost towns

Photographed from above, acres of snow engulf buildings as far as the eye can see.
Up close, the surreal details shine through; light fixtures adorned with intricate icicles, couches enveloped in snowdrift and sheets of ice spilling in from open doors, frozen in time.
These are the abandoned ghost towns towns that surround the coal-mining center of Vorkuta in Russia’s Arctic north, swathed in snow and ice following recent brutally cold temperatures.
Moscow-based photographer Maria Passer traveled to the area to capture how the extreme weather has impacted abandoned buildings.
1 2 3 32