Persecution of Christians

Today, just like in the book of Acts, Christians are persecuted all over the world for following Jesus.

PERSECUTION AT A GLANCE

Christians remain one of the most persecuted religious groups in the world. While Christian persecution takes many forms, it is defined as any hostility experienced as a result of identification with Christ. Christian torture remains an issue for believers throughout the world including the risk of imprisonment, loss of home and assets, physical torture, beheadings, rape and even death as a result of their faith.

Trends show that countries in AfricaAsia and the Middle East are intensifying persecution against Christians, and perhaps the most vulnerable are Christian women, who often face double persecution for faith and gender.

Every day we receive new reports of Christians who face threats, unjust imprisonment, harassment, beatings and even loss of family because of their faith in Jesus.

Every month:

  • 255 Christians are killed
  • 104 are abducted
  • 180 Christian women are raped, sexually harassed or forced into marriage
  • 66 churches are attacked
  • 160 Christians are detained without trial and imprisoned

Every year, we release the World Watch List—a global indicator of countries where human and religious rights are being violated, and those countries most vulnerable to societal unrest and destabilization. This is the 26thyear of the Open Doors World Watch List, and it remains the only annual in-depth survey to rank the 50 most difficult countries in which to be a Christian.

According to our research:

  • 215 million Christians experience high levels of persecution in the countries on the World Watch List. This represents 1 in 12 Christians worldwide.
  • North Korea is ranked #1 for the 17th consecutive year as the most dangerous country for Christians.
  • During the World Watch List 2018 reporting period: 3,066 Christians were killed; 1,252 were abducted; 1,020 were raped or sexually harassed; and 793 churches were attacked.
  • Islamic Oppression fuels Christian persecution in 8 of the top 10 countries.

MAJOR TRENDS IN CHRISTIAN PERSECUTION 

THE SPREAD OF RADICAL ISLAM

Islamic oppression is one of the most widely recognized sources of persecution for Christians in the world today—and it continues to spread—aiming to bring many parts of the world under Sharia law. The movement, which often results in Islamic militancy and the persecution of Christians, is expanding in Asia (Philippines, Bangladesh, Indonesia) and Africa (Egypt, Nigeria, Somalia).

THE RISE OF RELIGIOUS NATIONALISM

In a resort to preserve power, insecure governments are using the country’s majority religion to marginalize Christians and other religious minorities. This phenomenon has been observed in some parts of Asia with Hindu nationalism (India, Nepal) and Buddhist nationalism (Myanmar, Sri Lanka) both gaining ground.

INTENSE CHRISTIAN PERSECUTION IN CENTRAL ASIA

Christian persecution in Central Asia is on the rise in countries like Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan—and Azerbaijan is new to the list at #45. There is a grassroots revival of Islam in Central Asia, and that means more pressure from the nationalist pro-Islamic governments and within society—causing increased persecution levels on two fronts.

CHRISTIAN PERSECUTION BY REGION

MIDDLE EAST

Dramatically increasing persecution against Christians in all areas of their lives, Afghanistan models an alarming trend that reverberates through the top ten on the list: no central government, extremist Muslim factions trying to control the country and an intense conservative Islamic population.

Afghanistan and North Korea nearly tied. Never before have the top two countries been so close in incidents. Both countries are extreme in intolerance and outright persecution of Christians in every area Open Doors monitors. Afghanistan now meets the same level of persecution as North Korea in five out of the six areas. This is a tragedy considering the efforts being made by the international community to help rebuild Afghanistan and yet failing to ensure freedom of religion. Reports of violence and human rights atrocities from North Korea are pervasive, while the situation faced by Christians in Afghanistan may be underestimated. It is hard for westerners to imagine a second country could nearly meet the levels of persecution seen in North Korea, but Afghanistan has reached that level this year.

In addition to Pakistan being the most violent toward Christians, the country also scored the highest in churches or church buildings being attacked, abductions and forced marriages.

ASIA

Led by North Korea, Christians living in many Asian countries continue to face intensifying persecution. Twenty-two of the 50 countries on the list are in Asia. India experienced a dramatic rise in Christian persecution, moving from No. 15 in 2017 to No. 11 this year. Radical Hinduism and Indian nationalism are driving factors in the increasing levels of unrest and instability Christians face. In 2014, India scored only 55 points, while in 2017, Open Doors World Watch List researchers assigned 81 points to the nation—one of the fastest and most intense increases seen. Nepal appears on the list for the first time and lands stunningly at No. 25 due to India’s religious nationalism spilling into the country.

AFRICA

Ethnic cleansing based on religious affiliation is becoming common in a number of sub-Saharan African countries like Somalia (No. 3), Sudan (No. 4), Nigeria (No. 14) and Kenya (No. 32). Terrorism connected with extreme Islam continues to plague many African nations, resulting in increased persecution of Christians.

THE AMERICAS  

Mexico (39) and Columbia (49) remain the only two nations outside the region of the Middle East, Asia and Africa to make the list. Both experienced increases in persecution, primarily attributed to organized crime, corruption and governmental instability.

TOP TEN COUNTRIES WHERE IT’S MOST DANGEROUS TO FOLLOW JESUS

According to research calculations, the top ten nations where Christians found it most dangerous and difficult to practice their faith in 2017 were:

  1. North Korea (94 points)
  2. Afghanistan (93 points)
  3. Somalia (91 points)
  4. Sudan (87 points)
  5. Pakistan (86 points)
  6. Eritrea (86 points)
  7. Libya (86 points)
  8. Iraq (86 points)
  9. Yemen (85 points)
  10. Iran (85 points)

Syria dropped out of the top ten list down to No. 15, while Libya jumped back on the top ten list at No. 7 (since being No. 10 in 2016).

Why can one never trust “the good” Muslims?

Tuesday, January 16, 2019

Religious fraud becomes a political barbarism!

For “good Muslims”, humanism, justice and humanity must depart if it promotes the “good cause” of Islam. It is a matter of being able to bluff, deceive and deceive “the unbelievers” in such a way that they are suddenly in “the house of peace” – that is, in a society where Islam, Allah and the Prophet’s army have pulverized all opposition. An act is good if it serves Allah.

This sad, but nonetheless, factual situation is being realized these days – the so-called “Oslo agreement” which was to create peace in the Middle East is being judged by commentators north and down. But why did everything fall into the gravel after precisely this agreement created such great hopes of peace – yes, not just the hopes of peace between Israelis and Palestinians was virtually a reality?

The whole thing was leaping as a result of the “good Muslim” Yasir Arafat having an underlying hidden agenda rooted in Islam. It turned out that he without scruples lied and deceived and led negotiations based on the bluff’s double play. He also admitted in 1994 that he had bluffed during these “peace talks” in Oslo, then he stated that he relied on the Oslo agreement in the same way that Muhammad appeared to the Quraish tribe in Mecca. The deal would apply for 10 years, but Muhammad ignored it. After two years he attacked Mecca. An agreement could be set aside if it earned “the good cause”.

In March, 624 AD t. beat the Prophet Mohammed and his forces, allegedly over 300 men, the army of the Quraish tribe, which should have been over three times as large. Mohammed himself was born into this tribe, but the vast majority of tribal members kept pagan faith and had to suffer for it. Mohammed’s victory at Badr was the start of what was to become the Muslim empire in the Middle East, Central Asia, North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula a hundred years later.
As for the Oslo agreement, Arafat thought he was nothing to blame – for as a Muslim he had the full right to lie to “the unbelievers” when it served the cause of Allah.

One of those who did not understand Arafat’s double play was then Foreign Minister Johan Jørgen Holst. For weeks he traveled the world and worked day and night to mediate between the people of power who could be involved in creating peace in the Middle East. He obviously bet that for Arafat the Norwegian sentence also applied: A word is a word and a man is a man. For Holst, the tragedy was accomplished by incurring life-threatening high blood pressure with subsequent two strokes and death.

Yes, but Islam lives and Muslims’ faith and hope is that one day millions of Muslims from Palestinian territories will enter Israel and chase the Israelis at sea.

If Israel falls, Europe and Norway also fall. Therefore, Islam and Islamization are deadly.

Why do the Norwegian authorities make a swan dance around Islam.

Tuesday, January 16, 2019


We see an increasing adaptation to the Islamic law of Sharia.

By Hege Storhaug, www.rights.no

We who have known Oslo in about one generation (= 33 years), often do not feel at home anymore. The Arabization through especially girls and women’s clothing suits, which shot violently across the country after the migration crisis in 2015, causes many to react. Not to mention the largest group from Islam-dominated countries, Somalis, who fill in particular Oslo’s inner east.

Culture walks with people, and the more wandering, the stronger people take with them both culture and religion, especially when the latter is Islam. And precisely Islam pushes forward in our streets, an Islam that is at its core a set of rigid rules of life and a hard law system. This is a fact, but most of all should be ignored by both politicians most and almost all leading media, while academia barely facilitates the eyelid.

We are alienated in our own home, Norway. Last year, HRS decided to photo document the “cultural revolution” that is happening outside our living windows, especially with your readers. The contributions have been many and good. As from Stavanger.

For some residents, including inmates, and especially those from the Islam-dominated world who left their homeland to seek shelter from power misery, the development of patience erodes. You want political action to push Islam’s power demonstration in the background. So far, hardly anything happens from our foremost political body, the Storting. We have asked politicians at the hands of whether Islam’s advancement is a theme in the political backdrops. The feedback is that Islam is a non-theme. Think it.

This is perhaps the greatest political betrayal of our time. A complete antiquarian human and social view is thus allowed to attach deeper and deeper roots to what was once the home of the Norwegian people with pillars of Christianity.

This is truly the cultural revolution of our time, and it is a revolution that is pointing backwards, far backward, worthy of value. And we have a lot to lose – just value.

The economic also destroys people’s patience. We are predicted to be 10,000 more in tax per person a year in around 2025. Erna Solberg has even tried to prepare for a work week of 43 hours. And we all – who have eyes and ears open – understand that the main reason is that too many unqualified people have come to Norway who live as if Norway were an eternal free lunch.

The employment figures speak for their very clear language. Disappointing few from the Islam-dominated world are in full-time work, we could show in 2014: Only 15 percent of Somalis work 30 hours per week or more. For Eritreans, the figure is 19 per cent. Syrians are well below 10 percent, Document wrote a few days ago. The share of community resources used for additional immigration and integration costs is increasing year by year, and for most people, the failed integration is linked to the number of hijabs and also the nikab. Do not sniff the snare, this can trigger a dangerous anger in parts of the population.

The recently deceased Arabian giant in Norwegian contemporary, Walid al-Kubaisi, said the following in the last major interview with him:

“Assimilation for me is a mental state where one lives by Norwegian values ​​and thinks as Norwegians.”

Can people then use the hijab – and think like Norwegians? No, al-Kubaisi replied:

“… The hijab doesn’t belong at school or at work. Hijab is for me a symbol of political Islam and a belief in sharia, the caliphate and a theological system that collides with democracy. It has nothing to do with Norwegian and Western values. If one goes with the hijab, one tells the outside world that one wants the Quran to be part of the society. ”

I’m afraid of Islam

Same al-Kubaisi openly expressed his disappointment at muslims in Norway that he thought had “listed” himself “unwise”.

“We (the Muslims) have reinforced the image media have mirrored: that Muslims are primarily religious beings who cannot liberate themselves from the traditions of the Middle Ages. Is it strange that people are skeptical about us? The Muslims in Norway must know that they are the weakest minority. Why? Because Norwegians fear them. The resistance to immigration is about the Muslims – not Poles, Vietnamese and Tamils. No one fears them. Norwegians fear the religion of Islam and that Islam must influence Norway. And I understand them. I myself am scared of Islam. Who will not be when one sees how political Islam destroys countries by country in the Middle East, and how many Muslims in Europe live in ghettos and hold on to traditional beliefs about how society should be governed (my highlight).

And I can say al-Kubaisi: I am also afraid of Islam, but even more afraid of the political paralysis of the “religion” of fear.