Linux has become the main system at home

Wednesday December 12, 2018


After Windows 10 came, it became clear that Microsoft got user details even if you said they should not have it.

Windows 10 uses so much system resources that it’s ridiculous. It’s a bad product compared to the different Linux versions that exist today.

Today, Linux is easier to set up and you do not need driver installation as all support exists in the systems. You can choose in almost 35,000 programs in total and everything is free.

All known online systems such as Spotify, Skype, Teamviewer, Instagram, Twitter, VK.com, Onedrive, Google Drive, Dropbox, Signal, Telegram, and many more have their own programs that you install from their respective sites.

A typical Linux distribution from the most well-known manufacturers found at www.distrowatch.com, takes less than 7GB of disk space with a variety of applications that include office applications, browser, email, full multimedia, torrent and more.

Linux rarely takes more than 1GB of RAM in boot and performs well on 4GB of RAM, and if you have fast internet, you can usually watch 4K video from YouTube without it.

The most well-known software manufacturers have Linux versions for their range. And the programs do not take much RAM in Linux. It is more stable and supports everything from Thunderbolt to old SVGA cards.

Several Linux versions can be installed next to Windows, it scales down the Windows partition and needs approx. 8GB disk space. You can then “mount” the Windows partition and access the home directory.

Now I have replaced most of the machine park with Linux. Here are some major versions:

Manjaro: https://manjaro.org
Mint: http://linuxmint.com
MX Linux: https://mxlinux.org
Elementary OS: http://elementary.io
Ubuntu: https://www.ubuntu.com
Debian: http://www.debian.org
Fedora: https://getfedora.org
Zorin OS: http://www.zorin-os.com

All of these are easy to install, update and install all the known programs mentioned above.

You can email me or sign up here if you want to try this. You download an iso image of the operating system and use a program called “unetbootin” to burn the iso to USB. Then you will find out which key to press to get up the boot menu on your PC. Then you decide to scale the disk for use for both systems, which you find easily and easily in the installation menu. Then enter information about name, username and password. Then the system installs itself, sets up the menu for Linux and Windows.

Then you will see opportunities you did not have with Windows.