One in three believes they have noticed climate change

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

A large majority believes climate change is happening, and one in three believes they have experienced it personally, according to a recent survey.

The survey was carried out by the Cicero Center for Climate Research, and some of the findings are presented during Arendalsuka Tuesday.

“It seems that there is a fairly small proportion of the population who believe that climate change does not happen, and also a small proportion of people who believe that humans do not affect the climate,” concludes Cicero researcher Marianne Aasen to NTB.

31 percent say they have experienced the climate change in person.

The survey was taken up in June, and Aasen therefore believes that it does not catch the summer tumble and the discussion of “good summer weather” versus climate crisis.
Solid

It’s just a taste of the survey Aasen can present in Arendal, since the numbers are so fresh. The researcher makes reservations that there may be some bias, but it is important to shout at the main picture, she emphasizes.

* A total of 77 percent believe the claim that climate change is going on is quite good or very good.

* Under 10 percent deny that human activity affects the climate, while around 70 percent think we contribute to the changes.

About 4,000 people have been asked, and it is TNS Gallup who has been collecting data.

Like the smoking act?

With annual surveys, the research center will monitor whether people’s views on climate change and climate change change. In particular, Aasen is keen to see how the policies the politicians arrive at affect people’s attitudes and behaviors.

Can measures to limit food shedding and driving have the same effect as the smoking act, which has helped to make smoking taboos in very many circles?

“We will look at the evolution of norms – what do people think is okay? It is especially interesting now that there are instruments on the stairs. Increases resistance when instruments are introduced? is something that Aasen is wondering about.

More than half of the respondents have little faith in the fact that “new technology will solve the climate problem so I do not have to change my lifestyle.” But many seem to have a certain hope that technology can save us. Nearly 26 percent say that this statement is neither bad nor good, and almost one in ten are confident that the technology will solve the climate problem.

Prefer carrots in front of whip

During Arendalsuka there are a number of events where the climate will be discussed. The Paris agreement puts pressure on politicians and industry to find solutions that cut the emissions.

Previous surveys have shown that people would like to contribute to addressing the climate problem, Aasen says. The question is how far they are willing to go and what measures they can swallow.

– People also want society to make the right choice, rather than punishing bad climate choices with high fees. Making vegetarian food more accessible and making it easier to choose collectively are measures supported, says Aasen.

Among other things, people find it easy to let pedestrians and cyclists get more space at the expense of the driver, according to the Cicero researcher.

“When it comes to changes that really make sense, like flying less and driving smaller cars, people generally indicate less willingness to do something,” says Aasen.

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