Gays: We are not to be ashamed of us

Friday, July 20, 2018

Hate crime against gays, lesbians and transpersonals must and must be taken seriously. We still have a way to go.

You’re holding hands with your boyfriend. You are called discusting and hear that you should be shot. You kiss a date good night. You must run from men who eventually hit you on the open street and you bleed. You tell the outside world that you’ve found someone you love. You get draped and have to go with violence.

All three events have taken place in Oslo during the year. We are very tired that the hatred of love is still so strong in many. We have all experienced the wonderful feeling that love is. Then you will not experience hate and insecurity for yourself and the one you love.

Last year, the police received 83 reviews of hatred crime against LHBT people. In addition, we know from the survey that only one in three reports. Often the perpetrator is unknown.

From the reported hat crime in Oslo 2017 it can be read that half of all who are exposed to hatred are less than 30 years old. Most homosexual men report hate crime, but they also report hatred crime from lesbians and transgender people.

There is an increase in hate crime reports from 41 cases in 2016 to 46 cases last year in Oslo. Nevertheless, this reason does not suffice to say that we are moving in the wrong direction. It is positive if fewer people refuse to report than before and the police are becoming increasingly adept at detecting and following up hate crime.

The government’s action plan for the LHBTI field, “Security, Diversity, Transparency”, proposes to create a common supervisor for the detection of hatred crime, common definitions for hatred crime throughout the country and having a greater professional environment in the field just in order to combat hate crime. It is an absolutely necessary work to ensure follow-up across the country, not only in Oslo where you have your own hate crime group.

An important and correct signal was sent in spring, when a unanimous parliament incorporated trans-people into the hatred definition. The hatred flourishes on the web as well, but unlike many other men who hate they are not just cellar rebels. Our haters have no trouble telling us straight forward as we walk the street.

Some of us not going hand in hand late at night. Some avoid parts of Oslo. We both have experienced it ourselves. Not because we are ashamed, but because the statistics say there may be a risk to take. That’s how we have it in Oslo.

Every Pride then you read debates around glitter and glamor, but to be allowed to be self and to love what you want, that is what Pride is about. That’s why 40,000 walked in Oslo’s streets a little while ago. That’s why 250,000 looked. They celebrated the love the way it is and the diversity Oslo is known for.

We still have the way that the acknowledgment we see during Pride will be everyday, throughout the country. Therefore, openness and visibility are important beyond Pride, and so attitude and information work is important in all layers of society – no one is ashamed of who they are.


My comment on this is:

Homosexuals shall not be discriminated or bullied. But gay is a sin according to the Bible, but it is up to God to punish them. They should not have special rights just because they are gay. The church should not marry them and the City Hall should not too.

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